Amy Holcomb Explains How Medical Tourism Helps Individuals and Companies

In life, we have the ability to plant and receive seeds of greatness.  These seeds, like anything we grow, need to be nurtured to obtain their full potential.  I constantly work on self improvement, humility to learn from others and effort...

In life, we have the ability to plant and receive seeds of greatness.  These seeds, like anything we grow, need to be nurtured to obtain their full potential.  I constantly work on self improvement, humility to learn from others and effort to share my seeds with others to help them grow in their journey.

Amy Holcomb is the CEO of SkyMedicus, a medical tourism company with an online dental and medical platform that helps clients compare options across different countries, hospitals, and doctors. She is one of an incredibly small percentage of female healthcare CEOs. 

How did you come to start SkyMedicus? Why is medical tourism important to you or your loved ones?

My personal journey starting SkyMedicus began 14 years ago when I went to the doctors because I hurt my back. The doctors told me that my ONLY option was to remove one of my vertebra and fuse my spine because I had two herniated discs. I was a single mom and that was not an option for me so I starting seeking alternatives.  My search took me to seek options outside of the country and eventually I did find a great non invasive option in Mexico.  The best part is that it cost me less than 25% of the price they wanted to charge me to remove my vertebrae and I never had to have surgery.  That was 14 years ago and it changed my life. Now, my passion is helping other people explore the possibilities of Medical Tourism to not only save them money, but for some, even save their lives.

How can employers use medical tourism to offset costs?

Employers have already tried to start achieving healthcare savings by limiting employee choice or designing benefit plans that encourage employees to use less healthcare.  What has happened as an obvious result is that employees needing surgical procedures either find they are forced to pay higher premiums or simply choose not to have the needed care.  These issues have unfortunately created a “no-win” situation of employers shifting costs around:  either the employer is forced to have unhealthy staff that utilize more sick days or they are forced to cover outrageous insurance premiums and pass on high deductible plans.  The trend of using Medical tourism to offset employer costs and leverage more patient choices is growing by many large US employers. SkyMedicus offers programs for employers, third party claims administrators and benefit consultants to provide access and choices for employees that creates a 30-60% savings.

What do you see as the challenges for you and your business? 

Regulations.  With big players involved requiring health insurance, it is only a matter of time before regulations are discussed and we plan to be on the cusp of those discussions helping steer them in the right direction.

What is it like being a woman in your line of work?

Corporate management as a woman can be difficult at times.  We have come quite far from when I first started in the professional world, but there are still disparages.  Now add to that the fact that I am a tall, blonde, very light skinned American and I work in an international arena.  Let’s just say, I stand out A LOT. A few years ago, I read an article in Forbes that stated only 4% of healthcare CEOs are women.  Most times I have to work harder and prove myself to be deserving of all we are doing and what we expect in return.  I am proud to represent women in this arena and my promise to myself is to never take success for granted or allow myself to get comfortable with stagnancy and I encourage all women to follow their dreams.

What is a day in your life like with this type of work?

I travel more often than not!  For instance, I just returned from India.  My day began with some press releases and signing of documents with partners.  Next, I walked several hospitals to help with accreditation then I had a great lunch of spicy Paneer (an Indian type of cheese) and chicken curry. After lunch, I had a meeting about possible legal legislation and then visited a patient that was at a local hospital of ours to introduce myself.  I ended my day with dinner and a glass of red wine.

Tell us a story that made you feel proud of the work that you do.

Sometimes I work with patients as their customer success managers to remind myself of the importance of the work that we do.  One gentleman had a double hip procedure that I helped him organize several years ago.  Earlier this year, he contacted me on Facebook and wrote the following “Going on 6 years and my hips are doing GREAT!!!!!….Couldn’t have done it without you…..!” This moment validates why I do what I do and my success in helping others change their lives.

What advice would you give to your 20 year old self? 

Stop and celebrate your milestones.  I tend to get caught up in hitting goals and moving to the next goal without acknowledging my accomplishments all too often.  I now try to always remind myself that I can never attain and appreciate success until I can fully learn to do this.

What do you eat for breakfast in the mornings and what’s your favorite type of exercise?

During the week I don’t eat until midday because my schedule can be hectic at times, so I always do a protein shake to ensure I am getting in my needed nutrients during the day.  On weekends, I tend to enjoy a nice omelet with hash browns and grapefruit juice with the occasional gluten free waffle. As for exercise, tennis is my favorite, but weather doesn’t always permit so most days I find myself in the gym on a treadmill, cycling bike or elliptical machine.

Who is the entrepreneur you admire most right now? 

Sophia Amoruso, owner of Nasty Gal.

What is the best advice you ever got, and from whom? 

In life, we have the ability to plant and receive seeds of greatness.  These seeds, like anything we grow, need to be nurtured to obtain their full potential.  I constantly work on self improvement, humility to learn from others and effort to share my seeds with others to help them grow in their journey.

Connect with Amy Holcomb of SkyMedicus

LinkedInhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/skymedicus

Websitehttps://skymedicus.com/

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